Should You have a Home Inspection in San Diego Before Selling Your Home?

If you are considering selling your home in North County, or San Diego county, finding out any hidden flaws and potentially pricey repairs, can save you thousands in negotiations with a home buyer and stop your home from falling out of escrow.

Being willing to invest the time and money, a thorough inspection before listing your property can make it easier to price your home, manage repairs, and even help sell it faster—and for more money.

HGTV states, “According to the U.S. General Accounting Office, more than 85 percent of homebuyers who applied for a mortgage also requested an inspection — not too surprising, since home inspections can reveal . But even though an inspection can make or break the deal, most sellers wait for the buyer to take the initiative (and chew their nails while awaiting the results). Here are a few reasons why you might benefit from getting your home inspected before you put it on the market.

Know where you stand in your home’s current state of repair

Generally, your final selling price is determined long before the inspector ever sets foot inside your door. That leaves a huge question mark lingering over your negotiations — are you going to be forced to drop your final figure again if a major problem is uncovered? By getting an inspection early, you’ll know what concessions a buyer might request. That allows you to set your asking price accordingly and find out whether or not you’re in a position to play hardball. Even in a seller’s market in San Diego, the buyer can negotiate for repairs, and often times their requests are for more than the repairs would have cost in you in the first place.

“Instead of worrying what a buyer’s inspector will uncover—and which could potentially kill the sale—be proactive with a pre-listing inspection,” Tristen Campanella, a Top Realtor® in San Diego says. This way, rather than being blindsided, you can then decide whether to make the necessary repairs or to account for that deferred maintenance by reducing the list price. Which leads us to…

You can make a bigger profit on your home sale.

Sure, a home inspection that you don’t have to do is going to cost money. (An inspection for a 1,200- to 1,500-square-foot house in an average market, for instance, will cost between $350 and $600, Lesh says.) But as the saying goes: Sometimes you have to spend money to make money.

After all, if you invest a little more to repair and spruce up anything the pre-inspection reveals, you can justify listing your home at a higher price, Campanella says. Plus, she adds, in most states, home improvement repairs you carry out before selling your house are deductible from the profit you make from the sale.

Sometimes, just knowing that a pro has given the house a proper once-over can persuade a buyer to make a bid (assuming that you actually follow the inspector’s recommendations).

“It minimizes surprises for a buyer, and can give a buyer more confidence in the property,” Campanella says.

You won’t have to scramble to fix things at the last minute

Once a buyer’s inspector submits a report, sellers are usually faced with two choices: If problems are found with the house, they can then either slash money from the sale price, or opt to carry out repairs before the closing date. That often leaves sellers in the lurch, having to get work done pronto—and sometimes paying a premium for the rush work.

After a pre-listing inspection, sellers can research contractors and make the necessary repairs within a time frame of their choosing, so that everything is ready before potential buyers even visit the property.

It can help stop back and forth negotiations between home seller and home buyer

Buyers often use their home inspection as leverage, asking the seller (that’s you!) for steep discounts based on what their inspector’s report reveals. Not surprisingly, the buyer’s inspection is often where the deal falls apart.

If you’ve already uncovered the issues and addressed them, you can raise the price of your home accordingly, a local San Diego home inspector says. “That gives the buyer less leverage in the request for repair process,” he explains.

Also, in red-hot markets where multiple bids come fast and furious, there’s always a chance that buyers might accept your pre-listing inspection without insisting on doing their own. This can make for a quicker sale, Tristen says.

What are the top things that will be inspected in your home inspection?

1. Electrical

2. Plumbing

3. Whole House Systems

4. Wood Destroying Pests

5. Doors

Check out the details of these inspections here 💻  http://bit.ly/3ifaKrT